Overview: NCMA Cardiology interventional services and procedures

Our highly trained staff can provide you with effective solutions to your health needs through the following interventional and surgical services:

Coronary procedures

  • Cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention
    A cardiac catheterization is an invasive, non-surgical procedure done to study the arteries that bring blood to the heart muscle and to check the function of the main pumping chamber of your heart. During a cardiac catheterization, the cardiologist inserts a small, hollow tube (catheter), into an artery or vein, and then guides it into the heart using X-ray. The cardiologist injects contrast (X-ray dye) through the catheter to outline the arteries and to show any blockages or narrowing that may exist.
  • Coronary stent procedure
    The coronary stent procedure now represents 70-90 percent of interventional procedures. The procedure uses a mesh tube (stent) to prop open an artery that has recently been cleared using angioplasty. The stent is collapsed to a small diameter and put over a balloon catheter.  It is then moved into the area of the blockage. When the balloon is inflated, the stent expands, locks in place and forms a scaffold. This holds the artery open. The stent stays in the artery permanently, holds it open, improves blood flow to the heart muscle and relieves symptoms (usually chest pain).
  • Coronary angioplasty procedure
    This procedure uses a balloon threaded through an artery to compress plaque and widen blood vessels so the blood can flow freely.

Vascular procedures

  • Arterial stent procedure
    The coronary stent procedure now represents 70-90 percent of interventional procedures. The procedure uses a mesh tube (stent) to prop open an artery that has recently been cleared using angioplasty. The stent is collapsed to a small diameter and put over a balloon catheter.  It is then moved into the area of the blockage. When the balloon is inflated, the stent expands, locks in place and forms a scaffold. This holds the artery open. The stent stays in the artery permanently, holds it open, improves blood flow to the heart muscle and relieves symptoms (usually chest pain).
  • Atherectomy procedure
    This procedure uses a balloon threaded through an artery to compress plaque and widen blood vessels so the blood can flow freely. Atherectomy uses a tiny cutting device to shave off plaque inside the artery, which is then carried out of the body.
  • Vascular and endovascular procedures and surgery
    Vascular and endovascular surgeries include procedures to treat aneurysms, peripheral and extracranial vascular disease, ischemia, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in diabetes, surgery for carotid artery disorders, carotid and peripheral artery stenting, balloon angioplasty, bypass surgery, and atherectomy.
  • Iliac / femoral / popliteal surgery
    Peripheral vascular bypass, also called a lower extremity bypass, is the surgical rerouting of blood flow around an obstructed artery that supplies blood to the legs and feet. This surgery is performed when the buildup of fatty deposits (plaque) in an artery has blocked the normal flow of blood that carries oxygen and nutrients to the lower extremities. Bypass surgery reroutes blood from above the obstructed portion of an artery to another vessel below the obstruction. A bypass surgery is named for the artery that will be bypassed and the arteries that will receive the rerouted blood. The three common peripheral vascular bypass surgeries include the iliac, femorial, and popliteal arteries or a combination of them.

Electrophysiological procedures

  • Pacemaker implantation
    A pacemaker is a small device that’s placed under the skin of the chest or abdomen to help control abnormal heart rhythms. This device uses electrical pulses to prompt the heart to beat at a normal rate. Pacemakers are used to treat heart rhythms that are too slow, fast, or irregular. Pacemakers can relieve some symptoms related to arrhythmias, such as fatigue (tiredness) and fainting. A pacemaker can help a person who has an abnormal heart rhythm resume a more active lifestyle.
  • Cardiac and thoracic surgery
    Major cardiac and thoracic surgeries include coronary bypass surgery and minimally invasive heart surgeryCoronary bypass surgery reroutes blood around clogged arteries to improve the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart. This is accomplished by taking a blood vessel from another part of the body. A heart lung machine is used during most coronary bypass graft operations. Minimally invasive heart surgeries are done by a specially trained heart surgeon without the use of the heart lung machine. The surgery is performed while the heart is still beating
  • Electrophysiology (with implantation of defibrillators and bi-ventricular devices)
    This study is a highly technical method for evaluating abnormal heartbeats. It allows the physician to closely evaluate the electrical function of the heart and determine the best treatment method. Possible treatments include pacemaker implantation and automatic anti defibrillation devices. These procedures are preformed by a cardiologist with advanced training in electrophysiology.
  • Transesophogeal echocardiography
    This is an ultrasound procedure used when the cardiologist suspects heart problems that cannot be adequately identified using standard echocardiograghy. During the exam, a small sonar device is passed into the esophagus, which lies directly behind the heart.  High frequency sound waves can then be focused on the heart to produce detailed pictures, viewed on a television monitor.
  • Cardioversion
    Cardioversion is a chemical or electrical regulation of the heart rhythm and to treat atrial fibrilation.
  • Cardiac catheter ablations (atrial fibrilation, atrial flutter, AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, AV reentrant tachycardia, atrial tachycardia)
    Cardiac catheter ablation is a medical procedure used to treat some arrhythmias. An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. During catheter ablation, a long, thin, flexible tube is put into a blood vessel in your arm, groin (upper thigh), or neck. This tube is called an ablation catheter. It’s then guided to your heart through the blood vessel. A special machine sends energy through the catheter to your heart. This energy finds and destroys small areas of heart tissue where abnormal heartbeats may cause an arrhythmia to start.

NCMA cardiology contacts and locations

NCMA Cardiology — Fountaingrove

3536 Mendocino Avenue, Suite 200
Santa Rosa, CA 95403

707-573-6166 main
707-573-6199 scheduling
Fax: 707-573-6165

NCMA Cardiovascular Surgery

3536 Mendocino Avenue, Suite 200
Santa Rosa, CA 95403
707-569-7860
Fax 707-545-5408

NCMA Vein Center

3536 Mendocino Avenue, Suite 200
Santa Rosa, CA 95403
707-573-6166 main
707-573-6199 scheduling
Fax: 707-573-6165

NCMA Cardiology — Petaluma

719 Southpoint Boulevard, Suite B
Petaluma, CA 94954
707-778-8421
Fax: 707-778-1702 or 707-778-8423

NCMA Cardiology — Sonoma

558 Third Street West
Sonoma, CA 95476
707-931-6469
Fax: 707-934-8492

NCMA Cardiology — Fort Bragg

721 River Road, Suite C
Fort Bragg, CA 95437
707-573-6166 main
707-573-6199 scheduling