NCMA News: Dr. Kimberly Brayton, M.D. – Advocate for Women’s Heart Health

NCMA News: Dr. Kimberly Brayton, M.D. – Advocate for Women’s Heart Health

Throughout her life, cardiologist Dr. Kimberly Brayton has always strived to make a significant impact in the field of health. She has been with NCMA for a year and is advocating for the awareness of women’s heart health.

During Dr. Brayton’s first week at NCMA, she was a guest speaker at a Women
and Heart Disease event for WHAM (Women’s Health at Memorial), a women’s
philanthropy group. “It’s going to be an important part of my practice,” she says.
“Community events like this are especially important for women’s groups, as well as
on-going provider education, and especially emergency room front line providers and
primary care physicians.”

Originally from Petaluma, Dr. Brayton began studying health policy in law school.
“It felt like health policy would have more of an impact than treating individual patients’s, a more global impact is what I had envisioned.” But while she found that good in theory, “I really didn’t find it so satisfying on the ground.”

Dr. Brayton discovered that what she really wanted was patient contact. “It turned out that on a day to day basis what’s more interesting for me is to feel like I’m making a difference in individual’s lives. I derive more joy from face to face interaction. It feels much
more meaningful.”

While in medical school, Dr. Brayton maintained an interest in public health in general. And because heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S., for men and for women, it made sense that to impact a greater number of patients, she would focus on cardiology.
“It would be interesting to me medically, but I would also be treating a population where
there was potential for a greater impact.”

Dr. Brayton finished her fellowship in 2013, and continued with a post-doctoral fellowship
in health services research at Stanford University, which she finished in 2014. For the next
two years she was intermittently practicing medicine while doing clinical research in cardiovascular drug development. But again, something was missing. “I found the research and drug development interesting and thought it would have an impact; but, I had the same problem I always had, there was not enough patient contact. For me,
it was pretty clear I needed to get back into the clinic. Here at NCMA, this is exactly what I want to be doing.”

Dr. Brayton’s husband is also a cardiologist with NCMA, Dr. Vishal Patel. They have a one-year old son, Aash and recently had a little girl, Laana. When Dr. Brayton is not pursuing one of her many interests, she is “chasing her son around.” The family also enjoys hiking adventures to see the countryside.